Home Inspection Services

Oldfield Inspection Services is a leader in the industry offering extremely thorough and professional home inspections.  Our inspections are performed in accordance with the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice of the American Society of Home Inspectors.  You will receive an electronic home inspection report, including color pictures, emailed to you the same day of your inspection.

Termite Inspection

Our Termite Inspections are handled by qualified and professional vendors that Oldfield Inspection Services hand selects to match our level of professionalism.

 

Radon Inspection

Radon is a carcinogenic gas that is hazardous to inhale.  Build-up of radon in homes is a health concern and many lung cancer cases are attributed to radon exposure each year.  About 12% of lung cancers and more than 20,000 Americans die of radon-related lung cancer each year.  The Surgeon General of the United States has issued a Health Advisory warning Americans about the health risk from exposure to radon in indoor air.  Dr. Carmona, the Nation’s Chief Physician urged Americans to test their homes to find out how much radon they might be breathing.  He also stressed the need to remedy the problem as soon as possible.  Testing is the only way to find out your home’s radon levels.

EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon. If you find that you have high radon levels, there are ways to fix a radon problem. Even very high levels can be reduced to acceptable levels. Radon has been found in homes all over the United States. It comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water and gets into the air you breathe. Radon typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Radon can also enter your home through well water. Your home can trap radon inside.

 

Any home can have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements. In fact, you and your family are most likely to get your greatest radiation exposure at home. That is where you spend most of your time. Nearly 1 out of every 15 homes in the United States is estimated to have an elevated radon level. Elevated levels of radon gas have been found in homes in your state.

EPA’s Radon Testing Check List:

• Notify the occupants of the importance of proper testing conditions. Give the occupants written instructions or a copy of this Guide and explain the directions carefully.

• Conduct the radon test for a minimum of 48 hours; some test devices have a minimum exposure time greater than 48 hours.

• When doing a short-term test ranging from 2-4 days, it is important to maintain closed-house conditions for at least 12 hours before the beginning of the test and during the entire test period.

• When doing a short-term test ranging from 4-7 days, EPA recommends that closed-house conditions be maintained.

• If you hire someone to do the test, hire only a qualified individual. Some states issue photo identification (ID) cards; ask to see it. The tester’s ID number, if available, should be included or noted in the test report.

• The test should include method(s) to prevent or detect interference with testing conditions or with the testing device itself.

• If the house has an active radon-reduction system, make sure the vent fan is operating properly. If the fan is not operating properly, have it (or ask to have it) repaired and then test.

 

If your home has not yet been tested for Radon have a test taken as soon as possible. If you can, test your home before putting it on the market. You should test in the lowest level of the home which is suitable for occupancy. This means testing in the lowest level that you currently live in or a lower level not currently used, but which a buyer could use for living space without renovations.